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I Don't Want to Go to School!

School

Should your child demonstrate distress separating at school, keep in mind that most departure behavior ends shortly after the parent departs.

 

Contact your child’s teacher later in the day to confirm the length of time your child continues to cry or refuse join the classroom activities.

 

If your child settles down quickly, the chances that departure behavior will improve each day is good, if the parent sticks by the established good-bye routine.

 

If the teacher reports your child continues to demonstrate distress in ways that impacts your child’s participation and enjoyment of the day or is disruptive to the academic environment of fellow classmates, ask for advice from the school on what you ALL can do, as a team, to establish a positive entry into school.

 

One year or more at school will leave most children feeling more at ease with predictable separations and more confident in their own budding social and cognitive skills.

 

Believe it or not, a week or so into summer vacation, don’t be surprised when your child says, “I’m really miss going to school!”